Feedback
Email Address Invalid. Please enter an email address in the format: [email protected]
Resistance Band Exercises for Swimming

Resistance band exercises are a great way to prevent and rehabilitate shoulder injuries. Bands can help you slowly build strength in your shoulders, arms, and back without overexerting yourself. If you swim frequently, and you’re worried about shoulder injury, these band exercises will surely help.

Before You Begin

When starting out these exercises, use a really stretchy band. You don’t want to exhaust your shoulders on these exercises. To slowly build up and protect your muscles, begin with a flexible band and gradually work your way to more taut bands.

Repeat each exercise in sets of 10 for both arms. Increase by another set every week until you feel you’ve reached an appropriate amount of sets. When you’re feeling strong and healthy, you should be able to perform about five sets with each arm.

Curls for Biceps

Curls are a great way to strengthen your bicep muscles. Biceps are essential to your pull for every stroke. As you do this exercise, don’t rush. Move your arms slowly to get the maximum out of each repetition.

  1. Hook the band underneath your foot and stand up straight.
  2. Make sure the band is fairly tight.
  3. Grip the other end of the band with your right hand, and rest it near your side. If you’re gripping the band correctly, your palms will be facing outward.
  4. Bend your right elbow, and pull the band toward your shoulder.
  5. Slowly bring your arm back to your side and repeat.
  6. Practice the curls with each arm.

Pulls for Internal Rotation

Finding a way to work on your internal rotation can be tough. Since you rotate your shoulders in all strokes, this exercise is perfect no matter what your specialty is.

  1. Loop the band at shoulder height around a fence or sturdy object.
  2. Stand away from the fence or object so that the band is taut, but not strained.
  3. Turn your right side toward the object, and grip the band with your right hand.
  4. Straighten your right arm out from your shoulder. Raise your arm so that it is shoulder-height.
  5. Bend your right elbow, and pull the band in toward your shoulder.
  6. Slowly straighten your arm and repeat.
  7. Switch hands and repeat with your left arm.

Pulls for External Rotation

Because of repetitive rotation in swimming, it’s easy to injure muscles and tendons near your rotator cuff. This exercise is great for all swimmers to help prevent or recover from injury.

  1. Loop the band at shoulder-height around a fence or sturdy object.
  2. Stand away from the fence or object so that the band is taut, but not strained.
  3. Turn your left side toward the fence and grip the band with your right hand.
  4. Straighten your right arm out from your shoulder. Raise your arm so that it is shoulder-height.
  5. Bend your right elbow and pull the band in toward your shoulder.
  6. Slowly straighten your arm and repeat.
  7. Switch hands and repeat this rotation with your left arm.

Flaps for Lateral & Deltoid Muscles

Flaps are fantastic for key swimming muscles: Your lateral and deltoid muscles. These muscles are commonly overused in swimming, and require a lot of attention.

  1. Grip the ends of the band with both of your hands.
  2. Hold the band straight above your head with your elbows locked.
  3. While keeping your arms straight, pull downward from your shoulders. If you’re performing this correctly, you should feel like a bird flapping its wings.

Outward Pulls for Lateral & Trapezius Muscles

Outward pulls are very important for those who are injured. They help build the trapezius muscle, which lies right over the shoulder. A lot of injuries occur near or under this muscle, so be careful. The lateral muscle is used frequently in all strokes, so this is a great muscle to strengthen.

  1. Stand on the band with both of your feet.
  2. Rest your right arm near your side.
  3. Lift your right arm straight out from your side. Keep your elbow locked.
  4. When you reach the height of your shoulder, lower your arm back to your side and repeat.
  5. After a few sets, perform the same pattern with your left arm.

Upward Extensions for Triceps

As previously stated, triceps are used in every stroke. This is a key muscle used on every pull. Therefore, it’s a great muscle to focus on. Upward extensions will help strengthen this muscle without straining it.

  1. Hold the band in your left hand.
  2. Place your left hand below your buttocks, and lock your elbow.
  3. Grip the other end of the band with your right hand.
  4. Place your right hand behind your head with your elbow pointing up.
  5. Straighten your arm and pull the band upward.
  6. Slowly relax your hand behind your head and repeat.
  7. Switch hands and perform the exercise again.

Go Slow

Band exercises can help tremendously with shoulder strength. Just remember to take it slow. Don’t overdo it. If your shoulders begin to hurt, speak with a doctor or physical therapist. He can cater to your specific needs, and pinpoint what muscles you should focus on.

If you're wondering how to strengthen your shoulders for swimming, bands are a great way to do it. Take a look at this guide for band exercise ideas.
Comments So Far: 4
Do you Swim?
- Ask Swimming experts questions
- Create a customized Swimming profile
- Find athletes for competitions or workouts
Yoga for Swimmers
Yoga can be a great way to add power and flexibility to your...
Stretches for Swimming
Stretching is a very important part of your swimming...
How to Prevent Shoulder Injuries from Swimming
Shoulder injuries are common in swimming. Read this guide...
Dryland - V-Ups with Pull Buoy
Dryland - V-Ups with Pull Buoy
Here's a fun variation on a standard dryland exercise...
Swim MAC Dryland/Weighlifting
Swim MAC Dryland/Weighlifting
April 8, 2009 Chris Ritter and Charlie Dragon sent me some...
Faster Swimming dryland routine called core complex
Faster Swimming dryland routine called core complex
This dryland exercise is designed to strengthen the...
close X